We Left Informatica. Now You Can, Too | Webinar

 

You can run a modern company on a mainframe. You can also ride a horse to the office. But would it really make sense to do this? Join us on Wednesday, March 22 for a discussion with Informatica’s former CEO Gaurav Dhillon and CTO James Markarian about reinventing data integration for the modern enterprise.

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Does your business still run on Informatica? It might make more sense to switch to a more modern platform. Join the conversation, hosted by industry analyst David Linthicum, as our distinguished panel discusses the key business reasons and technology factors driving modern enterprises to embrace data integration built for the cloud.

They will also cover:

  • The evolution of data integration – from the pre-internet, mainframe days of Informatica – to today’s modern cloud solutions
  • How they have re-invented application and data integration in the cloud
  • The changing role of IT – from “helicopter” to enabler
  • The cost to modern enterprises of inaction
  • Why sticking to the status quo is not an option

Register for this exclusive webinar here and be sure to join the conversation on Wednesday at 11am PT/ 2pm ET.

Finally viable: Best-of-breed enterprise environments

It’s one of the oldest, most contentious rivalries in the enterprise application arena: What’s better, best-of-breed environments or single-vendor suites? Since the turn of the century, suite vendors have argued that their approach avoids the steep data integration challenges that can be inherent with best-of-breed. On the flip side, point solution vendors say that enterprise suites pack in a lot of “dead wood” but don’t offer the real functionality, or customization potential, that is needed.

However, unlike religion and politics, this is one argument that is headed toward extinction. The biggest barrier to best-of-breed strategies — data integration — is, hands down, easier by an order of magnitude today, thanks to built-for-the-cloud app integration solutions that eliminate previous barriers. As a result, best-of-breed application environments aren’t just viable, they’re readily attainable.

Two dimensions of data integration

There are two ways in which data integration has dramatically improved with native cloud solutions: on the back end, between the applications themselves, and on the front end, from the user experience perspective.

On the back end, one of the first-order implications of a robust data model is the number of connectors a data integration solution provides. SnapLogic has hundreds of Snaps (connectors) and that’s not coincidental. Our library of Snaps proves our suitability to the modern world; it’s an order of magnitude easier to build and support a SnapLogic connector than an Informatica connector — the integration tool of choice for last-century best-of-breed environments — because our data model fits the modern world.

As a result, customers are up and running with SnapLogic in a day or two. In minutes we can show customers what SnapLogic is capable of doing. This is in comparison to Informatica and other legacy integration technologies; here, developers or consultants can work for weeks or months on the same integration project and still have nothing. They can’t deliver quickly due to the limitations of the underlying technology.

The ease of big data integration with SnapLogic has profound implications on the user experience. Instead of having to beg analysts to do ETLs (extract, transfer, and load) to pull the data set they need, SnapLogic users can get whatever data they want, themselves. They can then analyze it and get answers far faster than under previous best-of-breed regimes.

These are not subtle differences.

The economics of cloud-based integration

The subscription-based pricing model of cloud-based integration services further democratizes data access. Instead of putting the burden on IT to buy and implement an integrated application suite — which can cost upwards of $100 million in a large enterprise — cloud-based integration technology can be acquired at a nominal per-user fee, charged to a corporate credit card. Lines of business have taken advantage of this ease of access, making their own cloud big data technology moves with the full knowledge and support of IT.

For IT organizations that have embraced their new mission of enablement, the appeal of cloud-based data integration is clear. In addition to allowing business users to work the way they want to, the cloud-based solution is infinitely easier to customize, and deploy and support globally. And it offers an obvious answer to the question, “Do I want to continue feeling the pain of using integrated app suites or do I want to join the new century?”

Find out more about how and why SnapLogic puts best-of-breed integration within every organization’s grasp. Register for this upcoming webinar featuring a conversation with myself, industry analyst and data integration expert David Linthicum, and Gaurav Dhillon, SnapLogic’s CEO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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James Markarian is CTO at SnapLogic. Follow him on Twitter @jamesmarkarian.

From helicopter to enabler: The new face of enterprise IT

Can an IT organization effectively run a 2017 business on 25-year-old technology? As someone who played a large hand in developing the data integration technology in question — at Informatica, where I was CTO for nearly two decades — I can tell you that the answer is simple: “No.”

A vastly different primordial landscape

That said, I know that when Informatica was created, it was the best technology for data integration at the time. The world was a lot simpler in 1992: there were five databases that mattered, and they were all pretty similar. There were just a few ERP systems: Oracle, SAP and a young PeopleSoft. Informatica was ideally suited to that software baseline, and the scale-up UNIX platforms of that era. The web, obviously, was not in the picture.

IT organizations were also a lot simpler in 1992. If any business person wanted new tech functionality — a new workstation added to a network, or a new report from a client/server system — they put their request into the IT queue, because that was the only way to get it.

IT is still important; it’s just different

Fast-forward 25 years to 2017. Almost everything about that primordial technology landscape, when Informatica roamed the world, is different. For example, now there’s the web, the cloud, NoSQL databases, and best of breed application strategies that are actually viable. None of these existed when Informatica started. Every assumption from that time — the compute platform, scale-up/scale-out, data types, data volumes and data formats — is different.

IT organizations are radically different, too. The command-and-control IT organization of the past has transformed into a critical enablement function. IT still enables core operations by securing the enterprise and establishing a multitude of technology governance frameworks. But the actual procurement of end-user technology, such as analyzing data aggregated from across systems and across the enterprise, is increasingly in the hands of business users.

In other words, the role of IT is changing, but the importance of IT isn’t. It’s like parenting; as your kids grow your role changes. It’s less about helicoptering and more about enabling. Parents don’t become less important, but how we deliver value evolves.

This is a good analog to the changes in enterprise IT. The IT organization wants to enable users because it’s pretty impossible to keep up with the blistering pace of business growth and change. If the IT organization tries to control too much, at some point it starts holding the business back.

Smart IT organizations have realized their role in the modern enterprise is to help their business partners become more successful. SnapLogic delivers a vital piece of required technology; we help IT organizations to give their users the self-service data integration services they need, instead of waiting for analysts to run an ETL through Informatica to pull the requested data together. By enabling self-service, SnapLogic is helping lines of business — most companies’ biggest growth drivers — to reach their full potential. If you’re a parent reading this, I know it will sound familiar.

Here’s another way to find out more about why IT organizations are embracing SnapLogic as a critical enabler: readSnapLogic’s new whitepaper that captures my conversation with Gaurav Dhillon, SnapLogic’s CEO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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Why enterprises must meet millennials’ expectations

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Millennials’ attitudes in the workplace have gotten a bad rap, the roots of which are explored in this extremely popular video by author and speaker Simon Sinek. But this blog isn’t a slam on millennials’ expectations for job fulfillment. It’s about meeting their expectations of how easy it should be to use enterprise technology — and that’s a good thing.

A very vocal majority

Since 2015, millennials have been the largest demographic group in the US workforce, numbering 53.5 million. They are now mainstream enterprise tech consumers, and there’s a thing or two we can learn. For example, millennials came of age using smartphones. In fact, 97% of millennials aged 25-34 own a smartphone. And I doubt that a single one would want to give up their smartphone for a separate flip phone, music player and camera.

The reality is, we live in an age where people expect multiple utility from technology, a driving force in innovation. How about a washer that also dries your clothes, that’s pretty rad. Or the motorcycle helmet that puts an entire dashboard of information right in front of your eyes, that’s radder still.

Expectations for multiple utility are similarly all over the workplace, and millennials are approaching the data consumption challenge with a clean slate. They say it should be easy, like a smartphone, and be self-service. Once again, millennials are clamoring for multiple utility.

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SnapLogic meets millennial expectations of modern business

This is an area where SnapLogic trumps legacy technologies. On its best day, the 25-year-old data integration technology offered by Informatica creates ETLs (extract, transfer, loads) and has some other capabilities added on. But at its core, Informatica was designed to deal with batch, relational, ETL-like kinds of problems. Unfortunately, no one in the working world, not even retiring Boomers, lives in batch mode. Business change happens in real-time, and our data and analytics need to support that.

From day one, SnapLogic’s integration platform has been designed to solve all kinds of data-in-flight problems in the enterprise. These include, as we called them in the last century, application integration problems like connecting Salesforce with SAP, or data integration problems, providing information feeds to solve modern analytic sorts of questions. We can use SnapLogic’s application integration architecture to solve problems with technologies that weren’t widely available in the last century like predictive analytics, machine learning, or wiring up large industrial enterprises with IoT sensors, to give you new profit pools and help do a better job of building products.

That’s the kind of multiple utility that people expect from their technology — it’s not about feeds or speeds, it’s about having a smart phone versus having a separate phone, camera and music player. That’s just so 1992, you know?

This is the “match point” that SnapLogic can defend into eternity. Hundreds of our customers around the globe testify to that. Almost all of these companies had some flavor of Informatica or its competitor, and they have made the choice to move to SnapLogic. Some have moved completely, in a big bang, and others have side-by-side projects and will migrate completely to SnapLogic over time.

Want to learn more about meeting today’s lofty expectations for enterprise tech? Read SnapLogic’s new whitepaper that captures my conversation with James Markarian, SnapLogic’s CTO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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Estimating Load and Performance of Integrations

One of the most common requests I hear from colleagues and customers is, “How do I estimate how many jobs I can run on a node and how fast will they run?” The immediate and most accurate answer is… it depends. While it may seem a flippant answer, it is a succinct response to a complex multidimensional problem. Let’s examine the variables. Continue reading “Estimating Load and Performance of Integrations”

iPaaS Meets IoT for Big Data Integration

This week SnapLogic Solutions Architect Jason Slater was interviewed about our new MQTT Snaps and Spring 2015 release on the Integration Developer News site.  He notes that, “when it comes to Internet of Things (IoT) data, we see 100% alignment with our approach to big data and cloud application integration.”

jason_slater_snaplogicHere are a few other comments from Jason about how SnapLogic connects data, applications and now things faster:

  • “Customers we talk to about their IoT strategy universally accept that traditional data warehousing approaches are not going to be feasible for this kind of big data storage and analytics… you simply can’t get ‘Things’ into a data warehouse.”
  • Commenting on SnapLogic’s big data integration capabilities, he noted: “Data scientists [and even business analysts] looking for big data insights don’t need to write Java code and complex queries….From the perspective of end-user productivity and time to value, SnapReduce makes designing complex big data integration easy by dynamically generating MapReduce code behind the scenes, leveraging the Cascading framework.  This allows business analysts and data scientists to avoid writing Java code and complex queries and instead focus on what’s most important:  gaining insight from their big data.”
  • “In addition to MQTT, we’re working toward supporting a number of emerging standards to ensure IoT data is able to be managed effectively as part of an overall big data integration and data lake strategy.”

You can read the entire Integration Developer News (IDN) write up on our Spring 2015 release here: SnapLogic Embraces IoT in Latest iPaaS; Adds Value with Hadoop-Ready Integrations.

Be sure to also register for the IDN web conference on iPaaS in June.

Guest Blog: SnapLogic and Box.net Partner for Box Innovation Network

Today, Box.net launched its Box Innovation Network, which encourages cloud partners like SnapLogic to help develop a vibrant ecosystem. I’ve already written about how SnapLogic can seamlessly integrate with complex developer ecosystems, so today I’m going to share the floor with Alex Willen, a developer advocate from Box.net, who has more details to share about the Box Innovation Network.

Thanks, Praneal!

I’m Alex Willen, and at Box, we’re huge proponents of driving innovation and openness in software development. It’s always a pleasure to work with companies like SnapLogic whose products and vision align with our own goals.

That’s why we’re excited to announce them as one of the founding partners in our newest platform program, the Box Innovation Network® (/bin). Designed to foster innovation in enterprise software, /bin will provide developers the tools they need – including technology, consulting and in some cases, even funding – to help them build and bring to market products that re-invent the way enterprises operate today.

But the Box/SnapLogic story doesn’t just start here. It really began in April 2010 when we launched the Box Snap – one of the first Snaps in the SnapStore. Earlier this year, it was the second-most downloaded Snap. Results like these clearly illustrate the power of not only SnapLogic’s suite of tools, which save customers the time and cost of custom development, but also the community that uses them.

We’re hosting an event at Dogpatch Studios in San Francisco tonight to celebrate the launch of /bin. SnapLogic’s CEO Gaurav Dhillon will join us for a roundtable discussion on innovation, moderated by Caleb Garling of Wired.com, that will also feature Jeff Haynie, CEO of Appcelerator; Oren Teich, COO of Heroku and Jerry Chen, VP of Cloud and Application Services for VMware. We’ll also have presentations by Box’s CEO Aaron Levie and VP of Platform Chris Yeh, plus a keynote by Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup.

We’re taping the event and will be posting the video later. However, if you’re interested in joining us in person, send us an email at bin@box.net. For more information about /bin, check out box.com/bin.