Data management takes center stage at Rutberg 2017 conference

Each year, research-centric investment bank Rutberg & Company gathers top business leaders and technology experts for an intimate, two-day forum where they discuss and debate the technology, ideas, and trends driving global business. The annual Rutberg 2017 conference took place last week in Half Moon Bay, California, and data management was front and center.

SnapLogic CEO Gaurav Dhillon joined Mesosphere CEO Florian Leibert and Segment CEO Peter Reinhardt for a spirited panel discussion on the growing data management opportunities and challenges facing enterprises today. The panel was moderated by Fortune reporter Jonathan Vanian.

A number of important data management and integration trends emerged, including:

  • LOB’s influence grows: Gaurav noted that more and more, “innovation is coming from the LOB,” whether in Sales, Marketing, Finance, HR, or elsewhere in the organization. These LOB leaders are tech-savvy, are responsible for their own P&L’s, and they know speed and agility will determine tomorrow’s winners. So they’re constantly on the hunt for the latest tech solutions that will drive innovation, spur growth, and help them beat the competition.
  • Data fragmentation on the rise: With individual LOBs procuring a flurry of new cloud applications and technologies, the result is often business silos and a disconnected enterprise. “The average enterprise has 10x more SaaS apps than a CIO thinks,” said Gaurav of the increasing SaaS sprawl, which is requiring CIOs to think differently about how they integrate and manage disparate apps and data sources across the enterprise.
  • Self-service integration is here to stay: The bigger a company gets – with more apps, more end-points, more data-types, more fragmentation – there’s never going to be enough humans to manage the required integration in a timely manner, explained Gaurav. Enter new, modern, self-service integration platforms. “The holy grail of integration is self-service and ease-of-use … we have to bring integration out of the dungeon and into the light,” Gaurav continued. And this means getting integration into the hands of the LOB, and making it fast and easy. The days of command-and-control by IT are over: “Trying to put the genie back in the bottle is wrong; instead you need to give the LOBs a self-service capability to wire this up on their own,” noted Gaurav.
  • AI will be a game-changer: Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are already making apps, platforms, and people smarter. Like with Google auto-complete or shopping on Amazon, we’re already becoming accustomed to assistance from, and recommendations by, machines. “Software without AI will be like Microsoft Word or email without spell-check,” it will be jarring not to have it, said Gaurav. AI is already being applied to complex tasks like app and data integration; it’s not a future state, he said, the start of “self-driving integration is happening today.”
  • The enterprise is a retrofit job: For all the latest advances – new cloud apps, AI and ML technologies, self-service integration platforms – the enterprise remains a “retrofit job,” where the new must work with the old. Large, global enterprises aren’t about to throw out decades of technology investment all at once, particularly if it is working just fine or well-suited to handle certain business processes. So, new cloud technologies will need to work with older on-premise solutions, once again cementing integration platforms as a critical piece of an enterprise technology strategy. “It will be a hybrid world for a long, long time,” concluded Gaurav.

Without question, data has become any organization’s most valuable asset, and those that are able to integrate, manage, and analyze data effectively will be the winners of tomorrow.

Gartner Names SnapLogic a Leader in the 2017 Enterprise iPaaS Magic Quadrant

For the second year in a row, SnapLogic has been named a Leader in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Integration Platform as a Service (iPaaS).

Gartner evaluated iPaaS vendors on “completeness of vision” and “ability to execute.” Those named to the Leaders quadrant, as Gartner noted in the report, “have a solid reputation, with notable market presence and a proven track record in enabling … their platforms are well-proven and functionally rich, with regular releases to rapidly address this fast-evolving market.”

In a press release issued today, SnapLogic CTO James Markarian said of the recognition: “Since our inception, we have been laser-focused on delivering a modern enterprise integration platform that is specifically designed to manage the data and application integration demands of today’s hybrid enterprise technology environments. Our Enterprise Integration Cloud eliminates the complexity of legacy integrations, providing a platform that supports fast and easy self-service integration.”

The Enterprise iPaaS Magic Quadrant is embedded below. We’d encourage you to download the complete report as it provides a comprehensive review of all the vendors and the growing market.

Gartner 2017 iPaaS MQ

Thanks to all of SnapLogic’s customers, partners, and employees for the ongoing support and for making SnapLogic’s Enterprise Integration Cloud a leading self-service integration platform connecting applications, data, and things.

Podcast: James Markarian and David Linthicum on New Approaches to Cloud Integration

SnapLogic CTO James Markarian recently joined cloud expert David Linthicum as a guest on the Doppler Cloud Podcast. The two discussed the mass movement to the cloud and how this is changing how companies approach both application and data integration.

In this 20-minute podcast, “Data Integration from Different Perspectives,” the pair discuss how to navigate the new realities of hybrid app integration, data and analytics moving to the cloud, user demand for self-service technologies, the emerging impact of AI and ML, and more.

You can listen to the full podcast here, and below:

 

Cloud fluency: Does your data integration solution speak the truth?

There’s been a lot of cloud-washing in the enterprise data integration space — vendors are heavily promoting their hybrid cloud services, yet for many, only a skinny part of their monolithic apps has been “cloudified.”

In an era of “alternative facts,” it’s important to make technology decisions based on truths. Here is an important one: A big data integration solution built on genuine, made-for-the-cloud platform as a service (PaaS) technology offers important benefits including:

  1. Self-service integration by “citizen integrators,” without reliance on IT
  2. For IT organizations, the ability to easily connect multiple data sets, to achieve a bespoke enterprise tech environment

These are in addition to the traditional benefits of cloud solutions: no on-premise installation; continuous, no-fuss upgrades; and the latest software innovation, delivered automatically.

Why “built for the cloud” matters

You can’t get these benefits with “cloudified” software that was originally invented in 1992. Of course, I’m referring to Informatica; while the company promotes its cloud capabilities, the software largely retains a monolithic architecture that resides on-premises, and does most of its work there, too.

In contrast, SnapLogic is purpose-built for the cloud, meaning there are no legacy components that prevent the data and application integration service from running at cloud speed. Data streams between applications, databases, files, social and big data sources via the Snaplex, a self-upgrading, elastic execution grid.

In more everyday terms, SnapLogic has 100% cloud fluency. Our technology was made for the cloud, born in the cloud, and it lives in the cloud.

The consumerization of data integration

Further to point 1 above, “citizen integrators,” industry futurists like R. “Ray” Wang have been talking about the consumerization of IT for more than half a decade. And that is exactly what SnapLogic has mastered. Our great breakthrough, our big innovation, is that we have consumerized the dungeon-like, dark problem of data integration.

Integration used to be a big, boring problem relegated to the back office. We’ve brought it from the dungeon to the front office and into the light. It is amazing to see how people use our product. They go from one user to hundreds of users as they get access to data in a secure, organized and appropriately access-controlled manner. But you don’t have a cast of thousands of IT people enabling all this; users merely help themselves. This is the right model for the modern enterprise.

“An ERP of one”

As for the second major benefit of a true cloud solution — a bespoke enterprise tech environment, at a fraction of the time and cost of traditional means — here’s a customer quote from a young CEO of a hot company that’s a household name.

“Look, we’ve got an ‘ERP of one’ by using SnapLogic — a totally customized enterprise information environment. We can buy the best-of-the-best SaaS offerings, and then with SnapLogic, integrate them into a bespoke ERP system that would cost a bajillion dollars to build ourselves. We can custom mix and match the capabilities that uniquely fit us. We got the bespoke suit at off-the-rack prices by using SnapLogic to customize our enterprise environment.”

To my mind, that’s the big payoff, and an excellent way to think about SnapLogic’s value. We are able to give our customer an “ERP of one” faster and cheaper than they could have ever imagined. This is where the world is going, because of the vanishingly low prices of compute power and storage, and cloud computing.

Today you literally can, without a huge outlay, build your own enterprise technology world. But you need the glue to realize the vision, to bring it all together. That glue is SnapLogic.

Find out more about how and why SnapLogic puts best-of-breed enterprise integration within every organization’s grasp. Register for this upcoming webinar featuring a conversation with myself, industry analyst and data integration expert David Linthicum, and Gaurav Dhillon, SnapLogic’s CEO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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Gaurav Dhillon is CEO at SnapLogic. Follow him on Twitter @gdhillon.

Finally viable: Best-of-breed enterprise environments

It’s one of the oldest, most contentious rivalries in the enterprise application arena: What’s better, best-of-breed environments or single-vendor suites? Since the turn of the century, suite vendors have argued that their approach avoids the steep data integration challenges that can be inherent with best-of-breed. On the flip side, point solution vendors say that enterprise suites pack in a lot of “dead wood” but don’t offer the real functionality, or customization potential, that is needed.

However, unlike religion and politics, this is one argument that is headed toward extinction. The biggest barrier to best-of-breed strategies — data integration — is, hands down, easier by an order of magnitude today, thanks to built-for-the-cloud app integration solutions that eliminate previous barriers. As a result, best-of-breed application environments aren’t just viable, they’re readily attainable.

Two dimensions of data integration

There are two ways in which data integration has dramatically improved with native cloud solutions: on the back end, between the applications themselves, and on the front end, from the user experience perspective.

On the back end, one of the first-order implications of a robust data model is the number of connectors a data integration solution provides. SnapLogic has hundreds of Snaps (connectors) and that’s not coincidental. Our library of Snaps proves our suitability to the modern world; it’s an order of magnitude easier to build and support a SnapLogic connector than an Informatica connector — the integration tool of choice for last-century best-of-breed environments — because our data model fits the modern world.

As a result, customers are up and running with SnapLogic in a day or two. In minutes we can show customers what SnapLogic is capable of doing. This is in comparison to Informatica and other legacy integration technologies; here, developers or consultants can work for weeks or months on the same integration project and still have nothing. They can’t deliver quickly due to the limitations of the underlying technology.

The ease of big data integration with SnapLogic has profound implications on the user experience. Instead of having to beg analysts to do ETLs (extract, transfer, and load) to pull the data set they need, SnapLogic users can get whatever data they want, themselves. They can then analyze it and get answers far faster than under previous best-of-breed regimes.

These are not subtle differences.

The economics of cloud-based integration

The subscription-based pricing model of cloud-based integration services further democratizes data access. Instead of putting the burden on IT to buy and implement an integrated application suite — which can cost upwards of $100 million in a large enterprise — cloud-based integration technology can be acquired at a nominal per-user fee, charged to a corporate credit card. Lines of business have taken advantage of this ease of access, making their own cloud big data technology moves with the full knowledge and support of IT.

For IT organizations that have embraced their new mission of enablement, the appeal of cloud-based data integration is clear. In addition to allowing business users to work the way they want to, the cloud-based solution is infinitely easier to customize, and deploy and support globally. And it offers an obvious answer to the question, “Do I want to continue feeling the pain of using integrated app suites or do I want to join the new century?”

Find out more about how and why SnapLogic puts best-of-breed integration within every organization’s grasp. Register for this upcoming webinar featuring a conversation with myself, industry analyst and data integration expert David Linthicum, and Gaurav Dhillon, SnapLogic’s CEO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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James Markarian is CTO at SnapLogic. Follow him on Twitter @jamesmarkarian.

From helicopter to enabler: The new face of enterprise IT

Can an IT organization effectively run a 2017 business on 25-year-old technology? As someone who played a large hand in developing the data integration technology in question — at Informatica, where I was CTO for nearly two decades — I can tell you that the answer is simple: “No.”

A vastly different primordial landscape

That said, I know that when Informatica was created, it was the best technology for data integration at the time. The world was a lot simpler in 1992: there were five databases that mattered, and they were all pretty similar. There were just a few ERP systems: Oracle, SAP and a young PeopleSoft. Informatica was ideally suited to that software baseline, and the scale-up UNIX platforms of that era. The web, obviously, was not in the picture.

IT organizations were also a lot simpler in 1992. If any business person wanted new tech functionality — a new workstation added to a network, or a new report from a client/server system — they put their request into the IT queue, because that was the only way to get it.

IT is still important; it’s just different

Fast-forward 25 years to 2017. Almost everything about that primordial technology landscape, when Informatica roamed the world, is different. For example, now there’s the web, the cloud, NoSQL databases, and best of breed application strategies that are actually viable. None of these existed when Informatica started. Every assumption from that time — the compute platform, scale-up/scale-out, data types, data volumes and data formats — is different.

IT organizations are radically different, too. The command-and-control IT organization of the past has transformed into a critical enablement function. IT still enables core operations by securing the enterprise and establishing a multitude of technology governance frameworks. But the actual procurement of end-user technology, such as analyzing data aggregated from across systems and across the enterprise, is increasingly in the hands of business users.

In other words, the role of IT is changing, but the importance of IT isn’t. It’s like parenting; as your kids grow your role changes. It’s less about helicoptering and more about enabling. Parents don’t become less important, but how we deliver value evolves.

This is a good analog to the changes in enterprise IT. The IT organization wants to enable users because it’s pretty impossible to keep up with the blistering pace of business growth and change. If the IT organization tries to control too much, at some point it starts holding the business back.

Smart IT organizations have realized their role in the modern enterprise is to help their business partners become more successful. SnapLogic delivers a vital piece of required technology; we help IT organizations to give their users the self-service data integration services they need, instead of waiting for analysts to run an ETL through Informatica to pull the requested data together. By enabling self-service, SnapLogic is helping lines of business — most companies’ biggest growth drivers — to reach their full potential. If you’re a parent reading this, I know it will sound familiar.

Here’s another way to find out more about why IT organizations are embracing SnapLogic as a critical enabler: readSnapLogic’s new whitepaper that captures my conversation with Gaurav Dhillon, SnapLogic’s CEO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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The need for speed: Why I left Informatica (and you should, too)

guarav_blog_headshotInformatica is one of the biggest, oldest names in enterprise technology. It’s a company I co-founded in 1992 and left over 10 years ago. Although the reasons why I left can be most easily summarized as “disagreements with the board over the direction of the company,” it all boils down to this: aging enterprise technology doesn’t move fast enough to keep up with the speed of today’s business.

About a year after I left, I founded SnapLogic, a company that has re-invented data integration for the modern enterprise — an enterprise that is increasingly living, working and innovating in the cloud. The pace at which enterprises are shifting operations to the cloud is reflected in stats like this: According to Forrester Research, the global public cloud market will top $146 billion in 2017, up from $87 billion in 2015.

Should you ride a horse to the office?

need-for-speedGiven the tidal wave of movement to the cloud, why would a company stick with Informatica? Often, it’s based on decisions made in the last century, when CIOs made strategic commitments to this legacy platform. If you’re the CIO of that shop today, you may or may not have been the person who made that decision, but here you are, running Informatica.

Going forward, does it make sense to keep running the company on Informatica? The truthful answer is it can, just as you can run a modern company on a mainframe. You can also ride a horse to the office. But is it something you should do? That’s where I say “no.” The direct path between a problem and a solution is to use appropriate technologies that are in synch with the problems being solved, in the times and the budget that are available today. That is really the crux of Informatica inheritance versus the SnapLogic future.

It’s true that the core guts of what is still Informatica — the underlying engine, the metadata, the user interface and so on — have to some extent been replenished. But they are fundamentally still fixed in the past. It’s like a mainframe; you can go from water cooling to air cooling, but fundamentally it’s still a mainframe.

The high price of opportunity cost

IT and business people always think about sunk costs, and they don’t want to give up on sunk costs. Informatica shops have invested heavily in the application, and the people, processes, iron and data centers required to run it; these are sunk costs.

But IT and business leaders need to think about sunk opportunity, and the high price their companies pay for missing out because their antiquated infrastructure — of which Informatica is emblematic — doesn’t allow them to move fast enough to seize opportunity when they see it.

Today, most enterprises are making a conscious decision to stop throwing good money after bad on their application portfolios. They recognize they can’t lose out on more opportunities. They are switching to cloud computing and modern enterprise SaaS. As a result, there’s been a huge shift toward solutions like Salesforce, Workday and Service Now; companies that swore they would never give up on-premise software are moving their application computing to the cloud.

Game, set, match point

In light of that, in a world that offers new, ultra-modern technology at commodity prices, you start to realize, “We ought to modernize. We should give up on the sunk costs and instead think of the sunk opportunity of persisting with clunky old technology.”

This is the “match point” that SnapLogic can defend into eternity. Hundreds of our customers around the globe testify to that. Almost all of these companies had some flavor of Informatica or its competitor, and they have made the choice to move to SnapLogic. Some have moved completely, in a big bang, and others have side-by-side projects and will migrate completely to SnapLogic over time.

Need more reasons to move fast? Read SnapLogic’s new whitepaper that captures my conversation with James Markarian, SnapLogic’s CTO and also an Informatica alumnus: “We left Informatica. Now you can, too.”

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